Origins of paraphasias in deep dysphasia: Testing the consequences of a decay impairment to an interactive spreading activation model of lexical retrieval

Nadine Martin, Gary S. Dell, Eleanor M. Saffran, Myrna F. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study investigates an account of atypical error patterns within the framework of an interactive spreading activation model. Martin and Saffran (1992) described a patient, NC, whose error pattern was unusual for the occurrence of higher rates of form-related than meaning-related word substitutions in naming and the production of semantic errors in repetition. They proposed that NC′s error pattern could be accounted for by a pathologically rapid decay of primed nodes in the semantic-lexical-phonological network that shifts the probabilities of error outcome in lexical retrieval. In the present study, Martin and Saffran′s account was tested and supported in a series of simulations that reproduce essential features of NC′s lexical error pattern in naming and repetition. Also described here are the results of a longitudinal study of NC′s naming and repetition, which revealed a shift in relative lexical error rates toward a qualitatively normal pattern. This change in error pattern was simulated by assuming that recovery reflects resolution of the rapid decay rate toward normal levels. The patient data and computational studies are discussed in terms of their significance for the understanding of aphasic impairments and their implications for models of lexical retrieval.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)609-660
Number of pages52
JournalBrain and Language
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Speech and Hearing
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

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