Organizational Strategy and Retroactive Inhibition in Free Recall

Thomas Andre, Richard C. Anderson, Graeme H. Watts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Subjects were asked to use either alphabetical or clustering strategies to learn two lists of nouns, the first letters of half of which were duplicated on both lists, and were tested on only list 1 or on both lists 1 and 2. Groups using the same strategy on both lists recalled fewer list 1 words than groups using a different strategy on each list, groups alphabetizing both lists recalled fewer list 1 words with duplicated than unique first letters, and groups tested on both lists showed list 1 recall no different from that of groups tested on only list 1 when there was just one response per retrieval cue but poorer recall when there were four. Overlap of strategy as the source of interference, item-specific unlearning, and output interference are discussed.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)609-628
JournalThe American journal of psychology
Volume87
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1974

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