Organic and inorganic sulfur constituents of a forest soil and their relationship to microbial activity.

M. B. David, M. J. Mitchell, J. P. Nakas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Sulphur constituents, microbial biomass, and sulphohydrolase activity were determined for each soil horizon at both hardwood and conifer sites in a Becket soil (Adirondack Mountains, New York). Drying of soil before analysis altered the S constituents. There was a threefold increase in sulphate in the organic horizons. Total S was greatest in the O horizons with 2010 and 1690 mu g S/g in conifer and hardwood solums, respectively. Mineral soil had a maximum S concentration in the B21h horizon. Sulphate concentrations were a small proportion (<15%) of total S in B horizons. Organic S was dominant (93% of total S) in all horizons. Microbial biomass was greatest in the 01 horizon of both hardwood and conifer solums. The B21h horizon contained the greatest biomass in the mineral soil. Sulphohydrolase activity exhibited the same distribution. Correlations between microbial biomass and sulphohydrolase activity with organic S indicate the potential for microbial S transformations. Sulphate formation by mineralization may be more important than exogenous inputs.-from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)847-852
Number of pages6
JournalSoil Science Society of America Journal
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science

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