Abstract

Optogenetics has emerged as an exciting tool for manipulating neural activity, which in turn, can modulate behavior in live organisms. However, detecting the response to the optical stimulation requires electrophysiology with physical contact or fluorescent imaging at target locations, which is often limited by photobleaching and phototoxicity. In this paper, we show that phase imaging can report the intracellular transport induced by optogenetic stimulation. We developed a multimodal instrument that can both stimulate cells with subcellular spatial resolution and detect optical pathlength (OPL) changes with nanometer scale sensitivity. We found that OPL fluctuations following stimulation are consistent with active organelle transport. Furthermore, the results indicate a broadening in the transport velocity distribution, which is significantly higher in stimulated cells compared to optogenetically inactive cells. It is likely that this label-free, contactless measurement of optogenetic response will provide an enabling approach to neuroscience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere201800269
JournalJournal of Biophotonics
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019

Fingerprint

Optogenetics
Photoexcitation
stimulation
Electrophysiology
Imaging techniques
Photobleaching
Velocity distribution
cells
electrophysiology
excitation
Phototoxic Dermatitis
neurology
Labels
organelles
Active Biological Transport
Neurosciences
organisms
Organelles
velocity distribution
spatial resolution

Keywords

  • cell activation
  • intracellular transport
  • label-free imaging
  • optogenetics
  • quantitative phase imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Hu, C., Sam, R., Shan, M., Nastasa, V., Wang, M., Kim, T., ... Popescu, G. (2019). Optical excitation and detection of neuronal activity. Journal of Biophotonics, 12(3), [e201800269]. https://doi.org/10.1002/jbio.201800269

Optical excitation and detection of neuronal activity. / Hu, Chenfei; Sam, Richard; Shan, Mingguang; Nastasa, Viorel; Wang, Minqi; Kim, Taewoo; Gillette, Martha L; Sengupta, Parijat; Popescu, Gabriel.

In: Journal of Biophotonics, Vol. 12, No. 3, e201800269, 03.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hu, C, Sam, R, Shan, M, Nastasa, V, Wang, M, Kim, T, Gillette, ML, Sengupta, P & Popescu, G 2019, 'Optical excitation and detection of neuronal activity', Journal of Biophotonics, vol. 12, no. 3, e201800269. https://doi.org/10.1002/jbio.201800269
Hu C, Sam R, Shan M, Nastasa V, Wang M, Kim T et al. Optical excitation and detection of neuronal activity. Journal of Biophotonics. 2019 Mar;12(3). e201800269. https://doi.org/10.1002/jbio.201800269
Hu, Chenfei ; Sam, Richard ; Shan, Mingguang ; Nastasa, Viorel ; Wang, Minqi ; Kim, Taewoo ; Gillette, Martha L ; Sengupta, Parijat ; Popescu, Gabriel. / Optical excitation and detection of neuronal activity. In: Journal of Biophotonics. 2019 ; Vol. 12, No. 3.
@article{5d32261e073e4ea68151120288e4f96c,
title = "Optical excitation and detection of neuronal activity",
abstract = "Optogenetics has emerged as an exciting tool for manipulating neural activity, which in turn, can modulate behavior in live organisms. However, detecting the response to the optical stimulation requires electrophysiology with physical contact or fluorescent imaging at target locations, which is often limited by photobleaching and phototoxicity. In this paper, we show that phase imaging can report the intracellular transport induced by optogenetic stimulation. We developed a multimodal instrument that can both stimulate cells with subcellular spatial resolution and detect optical pathlength (OPL) changes with nanometer scale sensitivity. We found that OPL fluctuations following stimulation are consistent with active organelle transport. Furthermore, the results indicate a broadening in the transport velocity distribution, which is significantly higher in stimulated cells compared to optogenetically inactive cells. It is likely that this label-free, contactless measurement of optogenetic response will provide an enabling approach to neuroscience.",
keywords = "cell activation, intracellular transport, label-free imaging, optogenetics, quantitative phase imaging",
author = "Chenfei Hu and Richard Sam and Mingguang Shan and Viorel Nastasa and Minqi Wang and Taewoo Kim and Gillette, {Martha L} and Parijat Sengupta and Gabriel Popescu",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1002/jbio.201800269",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
journal = "Journal of Biophotonics",
issn = "1864-063X",
publisher = "Wiley-VCH Verlag",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Optical excitation and detection of neuronal activity

AU - Hu, Chenfei

AU - Sam, Richard

AU - Shan, Mingguang

AU - Nastasa, Viorel

AU - Wang, Minqi

AU - Kim, Taewoo

AU - Gillette, Martha L

AU - Sengupta, Parijat

AU - Popescu, Gabriel

PY - 2019/3

Y1 - 2019/3

N2 - Optogenetics has emerged as an exciting tool for manipulating neural activity, which in turn, can modulate behavior in live organisms. However, detecting the response to the optical stimulation requires electrophysiology with physical contact or fluorescent imaging at target locations, which is often limited by photobleaching and phototoxicity. In this paper, we show that phase imaging can report the intracellular transport induced by optogenetic stimulation. We developed a multimodal instrument that can both stimulate cells with subcellular spatial resolution and detect optical pathlength (OPL) changes with nanometer scale sensitivity. We found that OPL fluctuations following stimulation are consistent with active organelle transport. Furthermore, the results indicate a broadening in the transport velocity distribution, which is significantly higher in stimulated cells compared to optogenetically inactive cells. It is likely that this label-free, contactless measurement of optogenetic response will provide an enabling approach to neuroscience.

AB - Optogenetics has emerged as an exciting tool for manipulating neural activity, which in turn, can modulate behavior in live organisms. However, detecting the response to the optical stimulation requires electrophysiology with physical contact or fluorescent imaging at target locations, which is often limited by photobleaching and phototoxicity. In this paper, we show that phase imaging can report the intracellular transport induced by optogenetic stimulation. We developed a multimodal instrument that can both stimulate cells with subcellular spatial resolution and detect optical pathlength (OPL) changes with nanometer scale sensitivity. We found that OPL fluctuations following stimulation are consistent with active organelle transport. Furthermore, the results indicate a broadening in the transport velocity distribution, which is significantly higher in stimulated cells compared to optogenetically inactive cells. It is likely that this label-free, contactless measurement of optogenetic response will provide an enabling approach to neuroscience.

KW - cell activation

KW - intracellular transport

KW - label-free imaging

KW - optogenetics

KW - quantitative phase imaging

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85056140503&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85056140503&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jbio.201800269

DO - 10.1002/jbio.201800269

M3 - Article

C2 - 30311744

AN - SCOPUS:85056140503

VL - 12

JO - Journal of Biophotonics

JF - Journal of Biophotonics

SN - 1864-063X

IS - 3

M1 - e201800269

ER -