Online knowledge sharing in a multinational corporation: Chinese versus American practices

Wei Li, Steve Downey, Tim Wentling

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In-depth interviews were conducted with Chinese and American users of a knowledge sharing system, pseudo-named Knowledge Everywhere (KE), being employed by a Fortune 100 company with operations in over 100 countries. The intent of these interviews was to identify factors influencing knowledge sharing behaviors among Chinese and American users of the KE system. Interview questions were framed using the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (Ventakesh, et al., 2003). Three primary conclusions emerged from the findings generated from the interviews. First, there is a perceived disconnect between knowledge sharing system usage and daily job performance. Second, language appears as a one-way barrier to knowledge sharing and not two-way as many practitioners believe. Third, cultural conservatism and perceived differences in practices hinders Chinese users' willingness to share and as a result gives the false impression that Chinese employees hoard information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASIST 2007 Proceedings of the 70th ASIS and T Annual Meeting - Joining Research and Practice
Subtitle of host publicationSocial Computing and Information Science
PublisherJohn Wiley and Sons Inc.
Volume44
ISBN (Print)0877155399, 9780877155393
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Event3rd Electronic edition of the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Information Science and Technology - Milwaukee, WI, United States
Duration: Oct 19 2007Oct 24 2007

Other

Other3rd Electronic edition of the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Information Science and Technology
CountryUnited States
CityMilwaukee, WI
Period10/19/0710/24/07

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems
  • Library and Information Sciences

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