Online computation of power system linear sensitivity distribution factors

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Linear sensitivity distribution factors (DFs) are commonly used in power systems analyses, e.g., to determine whether or not the system is N-1 secure. This paper proposes a method to compute linear sensitivity distribution factors (DFs) in near real-time without relying on the system power flow model. Instead, through linear least-squares estimation (LSE), the proposed method only uses high-frequency synchronized data collected from phasor measurement units (PMUs) to estimate the injection shift factors (ISFs). Subsequently, ISFs can be used to compute other DFs. Such a measurement-based approach is desirable since it is adaptive to changes in system operating point and topology. We illustrate the value of the proposed measurement-based DF estimation approach over the traditional model-based method through several examples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of IREP Symposium
Subtitle of host publicationBulk Power System Dynamics and Control - IX Optimization, Security and Control of the Emerging Power Grid, IREP 2013
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 23 2013
Event2013 IREP Symposium on Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control - IX Optimization, Security and Control of the Emerging Power Grid, IREP 2013 - Rethymno, Greece
Duration: Aug 25 2013Aug 30 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings of IREP Symposium: Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control - IX Optimization, Security and Control of the Emerging Power Grid, IREP 2013

Other

Other2013 IREP Symposium on Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control - IX Optimization, Security and Control of the Emerging Power Grid, IREP 2013
CountryGreece
CityRethymno
Period8/25/138/30/13

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Control and Systems Engineering

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