On the State of Fish, Fisheries, and Fisheries Management Practices Around the Globe: Sharing National Perspectives to Build Understanding

Steven J. Cooke, Abigail J. Lynch, Shane Vatland, Danielle A. Reich, Julie E. Claussen

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

Abstract

From the polar oceans to flooded rice fields in southeast Asia to the Amazon River in South America, humans have forged strong nutritional, economic, and social/cultural connections with fish. The relationships between humans (and indeed humanity) and fish can be traced back to the earliest human settlements, with evidence of fishing dating back as early as 70 thousand years ago (O'Connor et al. 2011; Henshilwood et al. 2001). Although we continue to capture fish as part of industrial-scale commercial fisheries from inland (Welcomme et al. 2010) and marine (Pauly et al. 2005) systems, which have substantial global reach, the role small-scale fisheries is being acknowledged. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-55
Number of pages3
JournalFisheries
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Keywords

  • INHS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

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