On Priming Action: Conclusions from a Meta-Analysis of the Behavioral Effects of Incidentally-Presented Words

Evan Weingarten, Qijia Chen, Maxwell McAdams, Jessica Yi, Justin Hepler, Dolores Albarracin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

This paper presents a summary of the conclusions drawn from a meta-analysis of the behavioral impact of presenting words connected to an action or a goal representation [1]. The average and distribution of 352 effect sizes from 133 studies (84 reports) revealed a small behavioral priming effect (dYE = 0.332, dRE = 0.352), which was robust across methodological procedures and only minimally biased by the publication of positive (vs. negative) results. More valued behavior or goal concepts (e.g. associated with important outcomes or values) were associated with stronger priming effects than were less valued behaviors. In addition, opportunities for goal satisfaction appeared to decrease priming effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-57
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Psychology
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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