On microstructure evolution in fiber-reinforced elastomers and implications for their mechanical response and stability

Oscar Lopez-Pamies, Martín I. Idiart, Zhiyun Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Lopez-Pamies and Idiart (2010, "Fiber-Reinforced Hyperelastic Solids: A Realizable Homogenization Constitutive Theory," J. Eng. Math., 68(1), pp. 57-83) have recently put forward a homogenization theory with the capability to generate exact results not only for the macroscopic response and stability but also for the evolution of the microstructure in fiber-reinforced hyperelastic solids subjected to finite deformations. In this paper, we make use of this new theory to construct exact, closed-form solutions for the change in size, shape, and orientation undergone by the underlying fibers in a model class of fiber-reinforced hyperelastic solids along arbitrary 3D loading conditions. Making use of these results, we then establish connections between the evolution of the microstructure and the overall stress-strain relation and macroscopic stability in fiber-reinforced elastomers. In particular, we show that the rotation of the fibers may lead to the softening of the overall stiffness of fiber-reinforced elastomers under certain loading conditions. Furthermore, we show that this geometric mechanism is intimately related to the development of long-wavelength instabilities. These findings are discussed in light of comparisons with recent results for related material systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number011007
JournalJournal of Engineering Materials and Technology, Transactions of the ASME
Volume133
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Hamilton-Jacobi equation
  • finite strain
  • homogenization
  • instabilities
  • microstructures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'On microstructure evolution in fiber-reinforced elastomers and implications for their mechanical response and stability'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this