Older Black Women Differ in Calcium Intake Source Compared to Age- and Socioeconomic Status-Matched White Women

Mina C. Mojtahedi, Karen L. Plawecki, Karen M. Chapman-Novakofski, Edward McAuley, Ellen M. Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Racial disparity in osteoporosis between older black and white women is well established; however, less is known regarding daily dietary and supplemental calcium intake in these populations. Moreover, racial differences in calcium intake are confounded by differences in socioeconomic status (SES). The objective of this study was to assess calcium intake and source in older black women (n=33) and white women (n=33), matched in age and SES. Calcium intake and source were evaluated by interview using a 46-item calcium food frequency questionnaire including all food groups and supplements. Black and white women were identical in SES and matched on age (black women 66.9±6.2 years vs white women 67.1±5.5 years [mean±standard deviation], P=0.85). No significant difference existed for dietary calcium intake between black and white women (974±524 vs 1,070±600 mg/day; P=0.65) or total calcium intake between black and white women (1,485±979 vs 1,791±887 mg/day; P=0.15). Dairy foods contributed most to dietary calcium intake in black and white women and differed by race (black women 402±269 mg/day, white women, 603±376 mg/day; P=0.02). Calcium intake from grains differed by race (black women 205±201 mg/day vs white women 130±234 mg/day; P=0.010) and fortified cereals were a major source of calcium for black women. Calcium supplementation contributed substantially to total calcium intake in both groups, with more white women (n=23, 70%) using supplements than black women did (n=19, 58%). However, no racial difference existed in supplemented calcium intake (black women, n=19; 889±605 vs white women, n=23; 1,034±460 mg/day; P=0.20). Our data suggest that total daily dietary and supplemental calcium intakes do not differ, but calcium intake from dairy foods and from grains differ in older black and white women matched in age and SES.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1102-1107
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume106
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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