Older adults' training preferences for learning to use technology

Tracy L. Mitzner, Cara Bailey Fausset, Julie B. Boron, Anne E. Adams, Katinka Dijkstra, Chin Chin Lee, Wendy A. Rogers, Arthur D. Fisk

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Older adults may benefit from using technology in their everyday lives. However, adults over 65 may need more training than their younger counterparts given they have had less experience with technology. In this study, 113 adults between the ages of 65 and 85 participated in focus group interviews discussing their training needs and preferences for technology items used in the home. Participants expressed an interest in receiving additional training, particularly for specific tasks. Participants also discussed preferences for various characteristics of training, such as who should conduct the training and for their preferred method of training. One of the most frequently discussed preferences was for self-training using text materials, such as a manual.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008
Pages2047-2051
Number of pages5
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Sep 22 2008Sep 26 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume3
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period9/22/089/26/08

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Mitzner, T. L., Fausset, C. B., Boron, J. B., Adams, A. E., Dijkstra, K., Lee, C. C., Rogers, W. A., & Fisk, A. D. (2008). Older adults' training preferences for learning to use technology. In 52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008 (pp. 2047-2051). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 3).