Observation of endoplasmic reticulum tubules via TOF-SIMS tandem mass spectrometry imaging of transfected cells

Corryn E. Chini, Gregory L. Fisher, Ben Johnson, Michael M. Tamkun, Mary L Kraft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Advances in three-dimensional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging have enabled visualizing the subcellular distributions of various lipid species within individual cells. However, the difficulty of locating organelles using SIMS limits efforts to study their lipid compositions. Here, the authors have assessed whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Tracker Blue White DPX®, which is a commercially available stain for visualizing the endoplasmic reticulum using fluorescence microscopy, produces distinctive ions that can be used to locate the endoplasmic reticulum using SIMS. Time-of-flight-SIMS tandem mass spectrometry (MS2) imaging was used to identify positively and negatively charged ions produced by the ER-Tracker stain. Then, these ions were used to localize the stain and thus the endoplasmic reticulum, within individual human embryonic kidney cells that contained higher numbers of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions on their surfaces. By performing MS2 imaging of selected ions in parallel with the precursor ion (MS1) imaging, the authors detected a chemical interference native to the cell at the same nominal mass as the pentafluorophenyl fragment from the ER-Tracker stain. Nonetheless, the fluorine secondary ions produced by the ER-Tracker stain provided a distinctive signal that enabled locating the endoplasmic reticulum using SIMS. This simple strategy for visualizing the endoplasmic reticulum in individual cells using SIMS could be combined with existing SIMS methodologies for imaging intracellular lipid distribution and to study the lipid composition within the endoplasmic reticulum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number03B409
JournalBiointerphases
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry
endoplasmic reticulum
Secondary ion mass spectrometry
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Endoplasmic Reticulum
secondary ion mass spectrometry
Mass spectrometry
mass spectroscopy
Observation
Imaging techniques
Ions
Coloring Agents
Lipids
cells
lipids
ions
Fluorine
Fluorescence microscopy
Cell membranes
Chemical analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biomaterials
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Observation of endoplasmic reticulum tubules via TOF-SIMS tandem mass spectrometry imaging of transfected cells. / Chini, Corryn E.; Fisher, Gregory L.; Johnson, Ben; Tamkun, Michael M.; Kraft, Mary L.

In: Biointerphases, Vol. 13, No. 3, 03B409, 01.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chini, Corryn E. ; Fisher, Gregory L. ; Johnson, Ben ; Tamkun, Michael M. ; Kraft, Mary L. / Observation of endoplasmic reticulum tubules via TOF-SIMS tandem mass spectrometry imaging of transfected cells. In: Biointerphases. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 3.
@article{e9c7b5728e8840e19c9be8efaee0c95d,
title = "Observation of endoplasmic reticulum tubules via TOF-SIMS tandem mass spectrometry imaging of transfected cells",
abstract = "Advances in three-dimensional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging have enabled visualizing the subcellular distributions of various lipid species within individual cells. However, the difficulty of locating organelles using SIMS limits efforts to study their lipid compositions. Here, the authors have assessed whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Tracker Blue White DPX{\circledR}, which is a commercially available stain for visualizing the endoplasmic reticulum using fluorescence microscopy, produces distinctive ions that can be used to locate the endoplasmic reticulum using SIMS. Time-of-flight-SIMS tandem mass spectrometry (MS2) imaging was used to identify positively and negatively charged ions produced by the ER-Tracker stain. Then, these ions were used to localize the stain and thus the endoplasmic reticulum, within individual human embryonic kidney cells that contained higher numbers of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions on their surfaces. By performing MS2 imaging of selected ions in parallel with the precursor ion (MS1) imaging, the authors detected a chemical interference native to the cell at the same nominal mass as the pentafluorophenyl fragment from the ER-Tracker stain. Nonetheless, the fluorine secondary ions produced by the ER-Tracker stain provided a distinctive signal that enabled locating the endoplasmic reticulum using SIMS. This simple strategy for visualizing the endoplasmic reticulum in individual cells using SIMS could be combined with existing SIMS methodologies for imaging intracellular lipid distribution and to study the lipid composition within the endoplasmic reticulum.",
author = "Chini, {Corryn E.} and Fisher, {Gregory L.} and Ben Johnson and Tamkun, {Michael M.} and Kraft, {Mary L}",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1116/1.5019736",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
journal = "Biointerphases",
issn = "1559-4106",
publisher = "American Vacuum Society",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Observation of endoplasmic reticulum tubules via TOF-SIMS tandem mass spectrometry imaging of transfected cells

AU - Chini, Corryn E.

AU - Fisher, Gregory L.

AU - Johnson, Ben

AU - Tamkun, Michael M.

AU - Kraft, Mary L

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - Advances in three-dimensional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging have enabled visualizing the subcellular distributions of various lipid species within individual cells. However, the difficulty of locating organelles using SIMS limits efforts to study their lipid compositions. Here, the authors have assessed whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Tracker Blue White DPX®, which is a commercially available stain for visualizing the endoplasmic reticulum using fluorescence microscopy, produces distinctive ions that can be used to locate the endoplasmic reticulum using SIMS. Time-of-flight-SIMS tandem mass spectrometry (MS2) imaging was used to identify positively and negatively charged ions produced by the ER-Tracker stain. Then, these ions were used to localize the stain and thus the endoplasmic reticulum, within individual human embryonic kidney cells that contained higher numbers of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions on their surfaces. By performing MS2 imaging of selected ions in parallel with the precursor ion (MS1) imaging, the authors detected a chemical interference native to the cell at the same nominal mass as the pentafluorophenyl fragment from the ER-Tracker stain. Nonetheless, the fluorine secondary ions produced by the ER-Tracker stain provided a distinctive signal that enabled locating the endoplasmic reticulum using SIMS. This simple strategy for visualizing the endoplasmic reticulum in individual cells using SIMS could be combined with existing SIMS methodologies for imaging intracellular lipid distribution and to study the lipid composition within the endoplasmic reticulum.

AB - Advances in three-dimensional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging have enabled visualizing the subcellular distributions of various lipid species within individual cells. However, the difficulty of locating organelles using SIMS limits efforts to study their lipid compositions. Here, the authors have assessed whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Tracker Blue White DPX®, which is a commercially available stain for visualizing the endoplasmic reticulum using fluorescence microscopy, produces distinctive ions that can be used to locate the endoplasmic reticulum using SIMS. Time-of-flight-SIMS tandem mass spectrometry (MS2) imaging was used to identify positively and negatively charged ions produced by the ER-Tracker stain. Then, these ions were used to localize the stain and thus the endoplasmic reticulum, within individual human embryonic kidney cells that contained higher numbers of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions on their surfaces. By performing MS2 imaging of selected ions in parallel with the precursor ion (MS1) imaging, the authors detected a chemical interference native to the cell at the same nominal mass as the pentafluorophenyl fragment from the ER-Tracker stain. Nonetheless, the fluorine secondary ions produced by the ER-Tracker stain provided a distinctive signal that enabled locating the endoplasmic reticulum using SIMS. This simple strategy for visualizing the endoplasmic reticulum in individual cells using SIMS could be combined with existing SIMS methodologies for imaging intracellular lipid distribution and to study the lipid composition within the endoplasmic reticulum.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85042691221&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85042691221&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1116/1.5019736

DO - 10.1116/1.5019736

M3 - Article

C2 - 29482330

AN - SCOPUS:85042691221

VL - 13

JO - Biointerphases

JF - Biointerphases

SN - 1559-4106

IS - 3

M1 - 03B409

ER -