Nutrigenetic contributions to dyslipidemia: A focus on physiologically relevant pathways of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the number one cause of death worldwide, and dyslipidemia is a major predictor of CVD mortality. Elevated lipid concentrations are the result of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Over 150 genetic loci have been associated with blood lipid levels. However, not all variants are present in pathways relevant to the pathophysiology of dyslipidemia. The study of these physiologically relevant variants can provide mechanistic understanding of dyslipidemia and identify potential novel therapeutic targets. Additionally, dietary fatty acids have been evidenced to exert both positive and negative effects on lipid profiles. The metabolism of both dietary and endogenously synthesized lipids can be affected by individual genetic variation to produce elevated lipid concentrations. This review will explore the genetic, dietary, and nutrigenetic contributions to dyslipidemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1404
JournalNutrients
Volume10
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2018

Fingerprint

Nutrigenomics
nutrigenomics
hyperlipidemia
Dyslipidemias
Lipid Metabolism
lipoproteins
Lipoproteins
Lipids
metabolism
lipids
cardiovascular diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases
pathophysiology
Genetic Loci
dietary fat
blood lipids
death
Cause of Death
Fatty Acids
therapeutics

Keywords

  • Dyslipidemia
  • Lipids
  • Nutrigenetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Nutrigenetic contributions to dyslipidemia : A focus on physiologically relevant pathways of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. / Hannon, Bridget A.; Khan, Naiman A; Teran-Garcia, Margarita De L.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 10, No. 10, 1404, 02.10.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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