Nutrient Digestion by Ileal Cannulated Dogs as Affected by Dietary Fibers with Various Fermentation Characteristics

H. E. Muir, S. M. Murray, G. C. Fahey, N. R. Merchen, G. A. Reinhart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We studied the effects of dietary fibers with various fermentation characteristics on nutrient digestion at the distal ileum and in the total tract of dogs. The following high-protein (34%), high-fat (23%) diets were fed: 1) a control treatment (CON) with 0% supplemental fiber; 2) beet pulp (BP), 7.5%; 3) low-cellulose mixture (LCM), 2.5% cellulose + 5.0% pectin; 4) high-cellulose mixture (HCM), 5.0% cellulose + 2.5% pectin; or 5) Solka Floc® (SF), 7.5% cellulose. Nutrient intakes by fiber-supplemented dogs were similar among treatment groups but greater (P < .05) than for dogs fed the control diet. Digestion of nutrients at the distal ileum was similar among groups except for fat: the dogs fed BP digested less fat than those fed the other sources of dietary fiber. Digestion of amino acids at the distal ileum was similar for all groups, except for lysine, which increased (P < .05) in digestibility as dietary cellulose concentration increased. Dogs consuming LCM had lower apparent ileal digestibility values for all nutrients, including most amino acids, than dogs consuming HCM or SF. Total tract digestion of DM and OM by dogs fed supplemental fiber was less (P < .05) than for dogs fed the control diet. The BP treatment was higher than other fiber treatments in total tract digestion of OM (P < .10) and total dietary fiber (P < .05). Total tract digestibilities of all nutrients exhibited either linear or quadratic responses to dietary cellulose concentrations. Apparent ileal and total tract nutrient digestion was influenced by the source of dietary fiber consumed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1641-1648
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume74
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1996

Keywords

  • Digestion
  • Dog
  • Fiber
  • Ileum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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