Noncontact dielectric friction

Seppe Kuehn, John A. Marohn, Roger F. Loring

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dielectric fluctuations are shown to be the dominant source of noncontact friction in high-sensitivity scanning probe microscopy of dielectric materials. Recent measurements have directly determined the friction acting on custom-fabricated single-crystal silicon cantilevers whose capacitively charged tips are located 3-200 nm above thin films of poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(vinyl acetate), and polystyrene. Differences in measured friction among these polymers are explained here by relating electric field fluctuations at the cantilever tip to dielectric relaxation of the polymer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14525-14528
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry B
Volume110
Issue number30
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Friction
friction
Scanning Probe Microscopy
Polymers
Scanning probe microscopy
Dielectric relaxation
Polystyrenes
polymers
Polymethyl Methacrylate
Silicon
Polymethyl methacrylates
polymethyl methacrylate
acetates
polystyrene
Electric fields
Single crystals
microscopy
Thin films
scanning
electric fields

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Noncontact dielectric friction. / Kuehn, Seppe; Marohn, John A.; Loring, Roger F.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, Vol. 110, No. 30, 03.08.2006, p. 14525-14528.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kuehn, S, Marohn, JA & Loring, RF 2006, 'Noncontact dielectric friction', Journal of Physical Chemistry B, vol. 110, no. 30, pp. 14525-14528. https://doi.org/10.1021/jp061865n
Kuehn, Seppe ; Marohn, John A. ; Loring, Roger F. / Noncontact dielectric friction. In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B. 2006 ; Vol. 110, No. 30. pp. 14525-14528.
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