Non-invasive in-vivo temperature mapping of ultrasound heating using fluorine-based magnetic resonance imaging agents

Andrew G. Webb, Nadine Barrie Smith, D. Scott Ellis, William D. O'Brien

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using fluorine based magnetic resonance to measure accurately hepatic heating from a focused ultrasound transducer in rats. This new method uses the temperature dependence of the difference in fluorine chemical shifts within a single molecule to provide internal compensation for complicating physiological effects. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 5 minutes of CW irradiation at 1.37 MHz from a focused transducer. Theoretical calculations based on the monopole source solution to the bio-heat transfer equation gave a volume-averaged temperature rise of 2.1°C. Preliminary experiments using protein encapsulated perfluorooctylbromide targeted to the liver gave an empirical rise of 2.0 ±0.4°C.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1609-1612
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium
Volume2
StatePublished - Dec 1 1995
EventProceedings of the 1995 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. Part 1 (of 2) - Seattle, WA, USA
Duration: Nov 7 1995Nov 10 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Non-invasive in-vivo temperature mapping of ultrasound heating using fluorine-based magnetic resonance imaging agents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this