Noise in biological circuits

Michael L. Simpson, Chris D. Cox, Michael S. Allen, James M. Mccollum, Roy David Dar, David K. Karig, John F. Cooke

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Noise biology focuses on the sources, processing, and biological consequences of the inherent stochastic fluctuations in molecular transitions or interactions that control cellular behavior. These fluctuations are especially pronounced in small systems where the magnitudes of the fluctuations approach or exceed the mean value of the molecular population. Noise biology is an essential component of nanomedicine where the communication of information is across a boundary that separates small synthetic and biological systems that are bound by their size to reside in environments of large fluctuations. Here we review the fundamentals of the computational, analytical, and experimental approaches to noise biology. We review results that show that the competition between the benefits of low noise and those of low population has resulted in the evolution of genetic system architectures that produce an uneven distribution of stochasticity across the molecular components of cells and, in some cases, use noise to drive biological function. We review the exact and approximate approaches to gene circuit noise analysis and simulation, and reviewmany of the key experimental results obtained using flow cytometry and time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. In addition, we consider the probative value of noise with a discussion of using measured noise properties to elucidate the structure and function of the underlying gene circuit. We conclude with a discussion of the frontiers of and significant future challenges for noise biology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)214-225
Number of pages12
JournalWiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Noise
Networks (circuits)
Genes
Medical nanotechnology
Flow cytometry
Gene Regulatory Networks
Biological systems
Microscopic examination
Nanomedicine
Behavior Control
Molecular Evolution
Communication
Cellular Structures
Processing
Population
Microscopy
Flow Cytometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Simpson, M. L., Cox, C. D., Allen, M. S., Mccollum, J. M., Dar, R. D., Karig, D. K., & Cooke, J. F. (2009). Noise in biological circuits. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology, 1(2), 214-225. https://doi.org/10.1002/wnan.22

Noise in biological circuits. / Simpson, Michael L.; Cox, Chris D.; Allen, Michael S.; Mccollum, James M.; Dar, Roy David; Karig, David K.; Cooke, John F.

In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology, Vol. 1, No. 2, 01.12.2009, p. 214-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Simpson, ML, Cox, CD, Allen, MS, Mccollum, JM, Dar, RD, Karig, DK & Cooke, JF 2009, 'Noise in biological circuits', Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 214-225. https://doi.org/10.1002/wnan.22
Simpson, Michael L. ; Cox, Chris D. ; Allen, Michael S. ; Mccollum, James M. ; Dar, Roy David ; Karig, David K. ; Cooke, John F. / Noise in biological circuits. In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology. 2009 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 214-225.
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