News Media as Political Institutions

Robert W McChesney, Victor Pickard

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses research on the policies, laws, and subsidies that create and shape the organizational structures and practices that form the basis of the news media. The research reviewed treats news media institutions as political actors and makes assumptions about journalism’s importance in a democratic society. Although this line of research, with its emphasis on political economic and normative questions, often has been marginalized in American mass communication scholarship, the authors explain its ongoing importance, particularly in relation to the journalism crisis, and, suggest future directions.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Oxford Handbook of Political Communication
EditorsKate Kenski, Kathleen Hall Jamieson
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Print)9780199793471
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2017

Fingerprint

political institution
news
mass communication
political actor
journalism
organizational structure
subsidy
Law
economics

Keywords

  • journalism crisis
  • news media institutions
  • press subsidies
  • media policy history
  • public goods
  • media structures
  • advertising-supported news
  • public media

Cite this

McChesney, R. W., & Pickard, V. (2017). News Media as Political Institutions. In K. Kenski, & K. H. Jamieson (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Political Communication Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199793471.013.74

News Media as Political Institutions. / McChesney, Robert W; Pickard, Victor.

The Oxford Handbook of Political Communication. ed. / Kate Kenski; Kathleen Hall Jamieson. Oxford University Press, 2017.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

McChesney, RW & Pickard, V 2017, News Media as Political Institutions. in K Kenski & KH Jamieson (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Political Communication. Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199793471.013.74
McChesney RW, Pickard V. News Media as Political Institutions. In Kenski K, Jamieson KH, editors, The Oxford Handbook of Political Communication. Oxford University Press. 2017 https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199793471.013.74
McChesney, Robert W ; Pickard, Victor. / News Media as Political Institutions. The Oxford Handbook of Political Communication. editor / Kate Kenski ; Kathleen Hall Jamieson. Oxford University Press, 2017.
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