New frontiers for organismal biology

Dietmar Kültz, David F. Clayton, Gene E. Robinson, Craig Albertson, Hannah V. Carey, Molly E. Cummings, Ken Dewar, Scott V. Edwards, Hans A. Hofmann, Louis J. Gross, Joel G. Kingsolver, Michael J. Meaney, Barney A. Schlinger, Alexander W. Shingleton, Marla B. Sokolowski, George N. Somero, Daniel C. Stanzione, Anne E. Todgham

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Understanding how complex organisms function as integrated units that constantly interact with their environment is a long-standing challenge in biology. To address this challenge, organismal biology reveals general organizing principles of physiological systems and behavior-in particular, in complex multicellular animals. Organismal biology also focuses on the role of individual variability in the evolutionary maintenance of diversity. To broadly advance these frontiers, cross-compatibility of experimental designs, methodological approaches, and data interpretation pipelines represents a key prerequisite. It is now possible to rapidly and systematically analyze complete genomes to elucidate genetic variation associated with traits and conditions that define individuals, populations, and species. However, genetic variation alone does not explain the varied individual physiology and behavior of complex organisms. We propose that such emergent properties of complex organisms can best be explained through a renewed emphasis on the context and life-history dependence of individual phenotypes to complement genetic data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)464-471
Number of pages8
JournalBioScience
Volume63
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

Fingerprint

Biological Sciences
organisms
genetic variation
complement
Research Design
physiology
experimental design
Maintenance
life history
Genome
Phenotype
phenotype
genome
Population
animals

Keywords

  • Life history
  • evolution
  • gene-environment interaction
  • individuality
  • phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Kültz, D., Clayton, D. F., Robinson, G. E., Albertson, C., Carey, H. V., Cummings, M. E., ... Todgham, A. E. (2013). New frontiers for organismal biology. BioScience, 63(6), 464-471. https://doi.org/10.1525/bio.2013.63.6.8

New frontiers for organismal biology. / Kültz, Dietmar; Clayton, David F.; Robinson, Gene E.; Albertson, Craig; Carey, Hannah V.; Cummings, Molly E.; Dewar, Ken; Edwards, Scott V.; Hofmann, Hans A.; Gross, Louis J.; Kingsolver, Joel G.; Meaney, Michael J.; Schlinger, Barney A.; Shingleton, Alexander W.; Sokolowski, Marla B.; Somero, George N.; Stanzione, Daniel C.; Todgham, Anne E.

In: BioScience, Vol. 63, No. 6, 01.06.2013, p. 464-471.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kültz, D, Clayton, DF, Robinson, GE, Albertson, C, Carey, HV, Cummings, ME, Dewar, K, Edwards, SV, Hofmann, HA, Gross, LJ, Kingsolver, JG, Meaney, MJ, Schlinger, BA, Shingleton, AW, Sokolowski, MB, Somero, GN, Stanzione, DC & Todgham, AE 2013, 'New frontiers for organismal biology', BioScience, vol. 63, no. 6, pp. 464-471. https://doi.org/10.1525/bio.2013.63.6.8
Kültz D, Clayton DF, Robinson GE, Albertson C, Carey HV, Cummings ME et al. New frontiers for organismal biology. BioScience. 2013 Jun 1;63(6):464-471. https://doi.org/10.1525/bio.2013.63.6.8
Kültz, Dietmar ; Clayton, David F. ; Robinson, Gene E. ; Albertson, Craig ; Carey, Hannah V. ; Cummings, Molly E. ; Dewar, Ken ; Edwards, Scott V. ; Hofmann, Hans A. ; Gross, Louis J. ; Kingsolver, Joel G. ; Meaney, Michael J. ; Schlinger, Barney A. ; Shingleton, Alexander W. ; Sokolowski, Marla B. ; Somero, George N. ; Stanzione, Daniel C. ; Todgham, Anne E. / New frontiers for organismal biology. In: BioScience. 2013 ; Vol. 63, No. 6. pp. 464-471.
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