Neural mechanisms of attentional control differentiate trait and state negative affect

Laura D. Crocker, Wendy Heller, Jeffrey M. Spielberg, Stacie L. Warren, Keith Bredemeier, Bradley P. Sutton, Marie T. Banich, Gregory A. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present research examined the hypothesis that cognitive processes are modulated differentially by trait and state negative affect (NA). Brain activation associated with trait and state NA was measured by fMRI during an attentional control task, the emotion-word Stroop. Performance on the task was disrupted only by state NA. Trait NA was associated with reduced activity in several regions, including a prefrontal area that has been shown to be involved in top-down, goal-directed attentional control. In contrast, state NA was asso-ciated with increased activity in several regions, including a prefrontal region that has been shown to be involved in stimulus-driven aspects of attentional control. Results suggest that NA has a significant impact on cognition, and that state and trait NA disrupt attentional control in distinct ways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberArticle 298
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume3
Issue numberAUG
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 10 2012

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Task Performance and Analysis
Cognition
Emotions
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain
Research

Keywords

  • Attentional control
  • Emotion
  • FMRI
  • Negative affect
  • Prefrontal cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Crocker, L. D., Heller, W., Spielberg, J. M., Warren, S. L., Bredemeier, K., Sutton, B. P., ... Miller, G. A. (2012). Neural mechanisms of attentional control differentiate trait and state negative affect. Frontiers in Psychology, 3(AUG), [Article 298]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00298

Neural mechanisms of attentional control differentiate trait and state negative affect. / Crocker, Laura D.; Heller, Wendy; Spielberg, Jeffrey M.; Warren, Stacie L.; Bredemeier, Keith; Sutton, Bradley P.; Banich, Marie T.; Miller, Gregory A.

In: Frontiers in Psychology, Vol. 3, No. AUG, Article 298, 10.10.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crocker, LD, Heller, W, Spielberg, JM, Warren, SL, Bredemeier, K, Sutton, BP, Banich, MT & Miller, GA 2012, 'Neural mechanisms of attentional control differentiate trait and state negative affect', Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 3, no. AUG, Article 298. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00298
Crocker, Laura D. ; Heller, Wendy ; Spielberg, Jeffrey M. ; Warren, Stacie L. ; Bredemeier, Keith ; Sutton, Bradley P. ; Banich, Marie T. ; Miller, Gregory A. / Neural mechanisms of attentional control differentiate trait and state negative affect. In: Frontiers in Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 3, No. AUG.
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