Negative functional coupling between the right fronto-parietal and limbic resting state networks predicts increased self-control and later substance use onset in adolescence

Tae Ho Lee, Eva H. Telzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent developmental brain imaging studies have demonstrated that negatively coupled prefrontal-limbic circuitry implicates the maturation of brain development in adolescents. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and independent component analysis (ICA), the present study examined functional network coupling between prefrontal and limbic systems and links to self-control and substance use onset in adolescents. Results suggest that negative network coupling (anti-correlated temporal dynamics) between the right fronto-parietal and limbic resting state networks is associated with greater self-control and later substance use onset in adolescents. These findings increase our understanding of the developmental importance of prefrontal-limbic circuitry for adolescent substance use at the resting-state network level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-42
Number of pages8
JournalDevelopmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume20
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Fronto-parietal network (FPN)
  • Independent component analysis (ICA)
  • Intrinsic network connectivity
  • Limbic network
  • Resting-state fMRI
  • Risk-taking behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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