Abstract

Considers the two main arguments that have been advanced by historians to connect National Socialism in Germany with modernity: one emphasizes the modernizing nature of the Nazi regime, while the other sees the Nazis as modernists. Problems are apparent in those arguments, which define the Third Reich as prehistory to the Federal Republic, because the arguments ignore the first principle of Nazism: the construction of a racial utopia. Yet the theses of Rainer Zitelmann and Michael Prinz have identified an important aspect of National Socialism in the extent to which the Nazis were committed to the renovation of German society. The National Socialists can be seen as modernists in the way that their political and racial designs were based on the premise of the discontinuity of history. The National Socialists constructed a totalitarian version of the modern.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-22
Number of pages22
JournalModernism/Modernity
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Keywords

  • NATIONAL socialism
  • MODERNITY
  • HISTORIOGRAPHY
  • GERMANY

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