Natural products as starting points for the synthesis of complex and diverse compounds

Karen C. Morrison, Paul J. Hergenrother

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Covering: up to 2013 Natural products and their derivatives are used as treatments for numerous diseases. Many of these compounds are structurally complex, possessing a high percentage of sp3 hybridized carbons and multiple stereogenic centers. Due to the difficulties associated with the isolation of large numbers of novel natural products, lead discovery efforts over the last two decades have shifted toward the screening of less structurally complex synthetic compounds. While there have been many success stories from these campaigns, the modulation of certain biological targets (e.g. protein-protein interactions) and disease areas (e.g. antibacterials) often require complex molecules. Thus, there is considerable interest in the development of strategies to construct large collections of compounds that mimic the complexity of natural products. Several of these strategies focus on the conversion of simple starting materials to value-added products and have been reviewed elsewhere. Herein we review the use of natural products as starting points for the generation of complex compounds, discussing both early ad hoc efforts and a more recent systematization of this approach. This journal is

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-14
Number of pages9
JournalNatural Product Reports
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Biological Products
Screening
Proteins
Carbon
Modulation
Derivatives
Molecules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Drug Discovery
  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

Natural products as starting points for the synthesis of complex and diverse compounds. / Morrison, Karen C.; Hergenrother, Paul J.

In: Natural Product Reports, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 6-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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