National Gross Domestic Product, Science Interest, and Science Achievement: A Direct Replication and Extension of the Tucker-Drob, Cheung, and Briley (2014) Study

Anqing Zheng, Elliot M. Tucker-Drob, Daniel A. Briley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We replicated the study by Tucker-Drob, Cheung, and Briley (2014), who found that the association between science interest and science knowledge depended on economic resources at the family, school, and national levels, using data from the 2006 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). In more economically prosperous families, schools, and nations, student interest was more strongly correlated with actual knowledge. Here, we investigated whether these results still held despite substantial changes to educational and economic systems over roughly a decade. Using similar data from PISA 2015 (N = 537,170), we found largely consistent results. Students from more economically advantaged homes, schools, and nations exhibited a stronger link between interests and knowledge. However, these moderation effects were substantially reduced, and the main effect of science interest increased by nearly 25%, driven almost entirely by families of low socioeconomic status and nations with low gross domestic product. The interdependence of interests and resources is robust but perhaps weakening with educational progress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)776-788
Number of pages13
JournalPsychological Science
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Keywords

  • cross-national
  • economic resource
  • expectancy value
  • open data
  • open materials
  • preregistered
  • replication
  • science achievement
  • science interest

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Psychology

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