Narrative structure and emotional references in parent-child reminiscing: Associations with child gender, temperament, and the quality of parent-child interactions

Kelly K Freeman Bost, Eunsil Choia, Maria S. Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present research examined child gender, temperament, and the quality of parent-child interactions as predictors of narrative style and references to emotion during mother-child and father-child reminiscing. Although models predicting parents' narrative styles were non-significant, results revealed significant interactions between parental hostility/intrusiveness during an interaction task and difficult child temperament. For mothers, greater hostility/intrusiveness was associated with fewer emotional references, but only when perceived difficult temperament was high. For fathers, greater hostility/intrusiveness was associated with more emotional references, but only when perceived difficult temperament was high. Additionally, greater paternal supportive guidance was associated with more references to positive emotions for fathers. No child gender effects were found to be significant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-156
Number of pages18
JournalEarly Child Development and Care
Volume180
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

Temperament
Hostility
Fathers
Emotions
Mothers
Parents
Research

Keywords

  • Attachment
  • Child temperament
  • Emotional references
  • Fathers
  • Narratives

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics

Cite this

@article{9eb45dc68bbc478284528bc48b7d6381,
title = "Narrative structure and emotional references in parent-child reminiscing: Associations with child gender, temperament, and the quality of parent-child interactions",
abstract = "The present research examined child gender, temperament, and the quality of parent-child interactions as predictors of narrative style and references to emotion during mother-child and father-child reminiscing. Although models predicting parents' narrative styles were non-significant, results revealed significant interactions between parental hostility/intrusiveness during an interaction task and difficult child temperament. For mothers, greater hostility/intrusiveness was associated with fewer emotional references, but only when perceived difficult temperament was high. For fathers, greater hostility/intrusiveness was associated with more emotional references, but only when perceived difficult temperament was high. Additionally, greater paternal supportive guidance was associated with more references to positive emotions for fathers. No child gender effects were found to be significant.",
keywords = "Attachment, Child temperament, Emotional references, Fathers, Narratives",
author = "{Freeman Bost}, {Kelly K} and Eunsil Choia and Wong, {Maria S.}",
year = "2010",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/03004430903415023",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "180",
pages = "139--156",
journal = "Early Child Development and Care",
issn = "0300-4430",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "1-2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Narrative structure and emotional references in parent-child reminiscing

T2 - Associations with child gender, temperament, and the quality of parent-child interactions

AU - Freeman Bost, Kelly K

AU - Choia, Eunsil

AU - Wong, Maria S.

PY - 2010/1/1

Y1 - 2010/1/1

N2 - The present research examined child gender, temperament, and the quality of parent-child interactions as predictors of narrative style and references to emotion during mother-child and father-child reminiscing. Although models predicting parents' narrative styles were non-significant, results revealed significant interactions between parental hostility/intrusiveness during an interaction task and difficult child temperament. For mothers, greater hostility/intrusiveness was associated with fewer emotional references, but only when perceived difficult temperament was high. For fathers, greater hostility/intrusiveness was associated with more emotional references, but only when perceived difficult temperament was high. Additionally, greater paternal supportive guidance was associated with more references to positive emotions for fathers. No child gender effects were found to be significant.

AB - The present research examined child gender, temperament, and the quality of parent-child interactions as predictors of narrative style and references to emotion during mother-child and father-child reminiscing. Although models predicting parents' narrative styles were non-significant, results revealed significant interactions between parental hostility/intrusiveness during an interaction task and difficult child temperament. For mothers, greater hostility/intrusiveness was associated with fewer emotional references, but only when perceived difficult temperament was high. For fathers, greater hostility/intrusiveness was associated with more emotional references, but only when perceived difficult temperament was high. Additionally, greater paternal supportive guidance was associated with more references to positive emotions for fathers. No child gender effects were found to be significant.

KW - Attachment

KW - Child temperament

KW - Emotional references

KW - Fathers

KW - Narratives

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77949349350&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77949349350&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/03004430903415023

DO - 10.1080/03004430903415023

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:77949349350

VL - 180

SP - 139

EP - 156

JO - Early Child Development and Care

JF - Early Child Development and Care

SN - 0300-4430

IS - 1-2

ER -