Abstract

This paper describes tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a heated AFM cantilever. Electrical and thermal characterization of the cantilever reveals that the cantilever is in thermal steady state in resonance oscillation, because its thermal time constant, around 300 μs, is much slower than the oscillation frequency of 70.36 kHz. Topographical imaging was performed on silicon calibration gratings of height 20 and 100 nm. The obtained topography sensitivity is as high as 200 μV/nm and the resolution is as good as 0.5 nm/Hz1/2. As in conventional AFM, the tapping mode operation demonstrated here can suppress imaging artifacts and enable imaging of soft samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTRANSDUCERS and EUROSENSORS '07 - 4th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems
Pages1541-1544
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Event4th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, TRANSDUCERS and EUROSENSORS '07 - Lyon, France
Duration: Jun 10 2007Jun 14 2007

Publication series

NameTRANSDUCERS and EUROSENSORS '07 - 4th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems

Other

Other4th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, TRANSDUCERS and EUROSENSORS '07
Country/TerritoryFrance
CityLyon
Period6/10/076/14/07

Keywords

  • Atomic force microscopy
  • Heated microcantilever
  • Topography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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