Nanoscale imaging of biological samples with responsivity corrected atomic force microscopy-infrared (AFM-IR) spectroscopy

Seth Kenkel, Rohit Bhargava

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Atomic Force Microscopy-Infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) is a powerful technique for mapping material composition at sub micrometer length scales. Unlike related technologies such as scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), the detected signal can be equally sensitive to both chemical and mechanical sample properties due to variations in the cantilever's response (or responsivity) to a sample perturbation local to the tip. Understanding cantilever responsivity has led to new approaches for correcting this effect, which show improved chemical specificity and imaging fidelity for heterogeneous samples. Here, we present implications of correcting the cantilever responsivity effect in AFM-IR images for studying biological samples at nanometer length scales and discuss the future of this emerging technology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNanoscale Imaging, Sensing, and Actuation for Biomedical Applications XVI
EditorsDan V. Nicolau, Dror Fixler, Ewa M. Goldys
PublisherSPIE
ISBN (Electronic)9781510624245
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
EventNanoscale Imaging, Sensing, and Actuation for Biomedical Applications XVI 2019 - San Francisco, United States
Duration: Feb 3 2019Feb 4 2019

Publication series

NameProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume10891
ISSN (Print)1605-7422

Conference

ConferenceNanoscale Imaging, Sensing, and Actuation for Biomedical Applications XVI 2019
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco
Period2/3/192/4/19

Keywords

  • AFM
  • AFM-IR
  • Infrared
  • QCL
  • Spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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  • Cite this

    Kenkel, S., & Bhargava, R. (2019). Nanoscale imaging of biological samples with responsivity corrected atomic force microscopy-infrared (AFM-IR) spectroscopy. In D. V. Nicolau, D. Fixler, & E. M. Goldys (Eds.), Nanoscale Imaging, Sensing, and Actuation for Biomedical Applications XVI [108910A] (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 10891). SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2510131