Nano-chemo-mechanical signature of conventional oil-well cement systems: Effects of elevated temperature and curing time

Konrad J. Krakowiak, Jeffrey J. Thomas, Simone Musso, Simon James, Ange Therese Akono, Franz Josef Ulm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

With ever more challenging (T,p) environments for cementing applications in oil and gas wells, there is a need to identify the fundamental mechanisms of fracture resistant oil well cements. We report results from a multi-technique investigation of behavior and properties of API class G cement and silica-enriched cement systems subjected to hydrothermal curing from 30 °C to 200 °C; including electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, electron microscopy, neutron scattering (SANS), and fracture scratch testing. The results provide a new insight into the link between system chemistry, micro-texture and micro-fracture toughness. We suggest that the strong correlation found between chemically modulated specific surface and fracture resistance can explain the drop in fracture properties of neat oil-well cements at elevated temperatures; the fracture property enhancement in silica-rich cement systems, between 110° and 175 °C; and the drop in fracture properties of such systems through prolonged curing over 1 year at 200 °C.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-121
Number of pages19
JournalCement and Concrete Research
Volume67
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2015

Keywords

  • Mechanical properties (C)
  • Microstructure (B)
  • Oil well cement (E)
  • Thermal treatment (A)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Building and Construction
  • Materials Science(all)

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