Multigenerational study of the effects of consumption of pcb-contaminated carp from saginaw bay, lake huron, on mink. 3. Estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor concentrations, and potential correlation with dietary pcb consumption

Elizabeth B. Shipp, Janelle C. Restum, Steve J. Bursian, Richard J. Aulerich, William G. Helferich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Mink (Mustela vison) were fed diets containing ocean fish (control diet, 0.0 ppm polychlorinated biphenyls, PCBs) or Saginaw Bay carp to provide 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 ppm PCBs to examine the effect of PCBs on homeostasis of binding sites for ovarian steroid hormones. Ranch-raised mink fed Great Lakes fish contaminated with PCBs, or treated with PCBs directly, have demonstrated reproductive impairment including anovulation, fetal resorption, delayed ovulation, increased gestation, and decreased litter size. Previous studies have demonstrated that estrogen and progesterone levels are unaltered in mink treated with PCBs, suggesting that the effectof PCBs on reproduction is not medi ated through alterations in hormone homeostasis. In vitro studies have demonstrated that the most likely meansby which PCBs exert antiestrogenic ability is through a downregulation ofthe estrogen receptor in normally estrogen-responsive tissues such as liver and uterus. Hepatic and uterine estrogen binding site concentrations were measured in female mink consuming diets containing PCBs for up to 18mo at up to 1 ppm. Hepatic estrogen binding site concentrations generally decreased with increasing dietary PCB concentrations. Uterine estrogen binding site concentration did not decrease in these animals. Uterine progesterone receptor concentration also did not change with increasing PCB consumption. In total, the response of hepatic and uterine estrogen anduterine progesterone binding sites in mink fed diets containing Saginaw Bay carp suggests that concentrations of PCBs available to uterine tissue may not have been sufficient to decrease uterine estrogen receptor, despite their effect on hepatic estrogen receptor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-420
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Toxicology and Environmental Health - Part A
Volume54
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1998
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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