Motivational barriers to retention of at-risk young adults in HIV-prevention interventions: Perceived pressure and efficacy

Jiaying Liu, Christopher Jones, Kristina Wilson, Marta R. Durantini, William Livingood, Dolores Albarracín

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Multi-session HIV-prevention interventions are efficacious but depend on the retention of clients over time. In a sample of at-risk young adults (N = 386), we investigated three potential motivational barriers that might affect the likelihood of retention. Perceived pressure, perceived efficacy and fear and anxiety during the initial session were measured, along with demographic characteristics, partner characteristics, and HIV-related health knowledge. Logistic regressions demonstrated that (1) in general, perceived ineffectiveness was negatively associated with retention; (2) perceived pressure or coercion was negatively associated with retention but only for younger clients; (3) experienced fear and anxiety had no significant association with retention. Implications for theory and counseling practices to reduce motivational barriers and effectively tailor interventions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1242-1248
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume26
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2014

Keywords

  • HIV-prevention
  • fear
  • ineffectiveness
  • pressure
  • retention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Motivational barriers to retention of at-risk young adults in HIV-prevention interventions: Perceived pressure and efficacy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this