Mothers' mastery-oriented involvement in children's homework: Implications for the well-being of children with negative perceptions of competence

Eva Marie Pomerantz, Florrie Fei Yin Ng, Qian Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

This research examined the idea that parents' mastery-oriented practices while assisting children with homework are particularly beneficial for children with negative perceptions of their academic competence. One hundred fourteen mothers and children (8 to 12 years old) participated in a 2-wave study. At the 1st wave, mothers took part in a daily telephone interview in which they reported on the frequency and nature of their assistance with homework every weekday for 2 weeks. Children reported on multiple dimensions of their psychological functioning at the 1st wave in a daily telephone interview as well as in traditional questionnaires; children completed the questionnaires again 6 months later at the 2nd wave. Mothers' mastery-oriented practices while assisting with homework predicted enhanced psychological functioning both concurrently and longitudinally only among children with negative perceptions of their academic competence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-111
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume98
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2006

Keywords

  • Homework
  • Mental health
  • Motivation
  • Parenting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Mothers' mastery-oriented involvement in children's homework: Implications for the well-being of children with negative perceptions of competence'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this