Mosquito politics: Local vector control policies and the spread of West Nile Virus in the Chicago region

Carmen Tedesco, Marilyn Sue O'Hara, Sara L McLafferty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Differences in mosquito control practices at the local level involve the interplay of place, scale and politics. During the Chicago West Nile Virus (WNV) outbreak of 2002, mosquito abatement districts represent distinct suburban clusters of human WNV cases, independent of characteristics of the local population, housing and physical environment. We examine how the contrasting actions of four districts reveal a distinct local politics of mosquito control that may have contributed to local-scale geographic differences in WNV incidence. This politics is rooted in political, economic and philosophical differences within and between administrative boundaries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1188-1195
Number of pages8
JournalHealth and Place
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

Keywords

  • Chicago
  • Clustering
  • Mosquito abatement
  • Mosquito control
  • Political Ecology
  • West Nile Virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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