Morphosyntax in child language disorders

Janna B. Oetting, Pamela Ann Hadley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Children with Down syndrome, like children with specific language impairment, present more difficulties with morphosyntax than is expected given their chronological age, nonverbal mental age, vocabulary ability, and mean length of utteranc; their grammatical errors also primarily involve omissions. Given the numerous deficits children with developmental language disorders experience, clinicians must consider the extent to which morphosyntax is a priority for a given child. Despite its time-consuming nature, language sampling remains the mainstay of authentic, ecologically valid assessment. A large literature base of studies have examined the morphosyntactic deficits of children with language impairments, and comparison studies across etiologies and co-occurring disorders have begun to appear in the literature. A central assumption of norm-referenced test interpretation is that children with language impairments will demonstrate below-average performance. Despite its time-consuming nature, language sampling remains the mainstay of authentic, ecologically valid assessment.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHandbook of Child Language Disorders
EditorsRichard G Schwartz
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages365-391
Number of pages27
Edition2
ISBN (Electronic)9781315283524
ISBN (Print)9781848725959
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Language Disorders
Child Language
Language
Language Development Disorders
Aptitude
Vocabulary
Down Syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Oetting, J. B., & Hadley, P. A. (2017). Morphosyntax in child language disorders. In R. G. Schwartz (Ed.), Handbook of Child Language Disorders (2 ed., pp. 365-391). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315283531-15

Morphosyntax in child language disorders. / Oetting, Janna B.; Hadley, Pamela Ann.

Handbook of Child Language Disorders. ed. / Richard G Schwartz. 2. ed. Taylor and Francis, 2017. p. 365-391.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Oetting, JB & Hadley, PA 2017, Morphosyntax in child language disorders. in RG Schwartz (ed.), Handbook of Child Language Disorders. 2 edn, Taylor and Francis, pp. 365-391. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315283531-15
Oetting JB, Hadley PA. Morphosyntax in child language disorders. In Schwartz RG, editor, Handbook of Child Language Disorders. 2 ed. Taylor and Francis. 2017. p. 365-391 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315283531-15
Oetting, Janna B. ; Hadley, Pamela Ann. / Morphosyntax in child language disorders. Handbook of Child Language Disorders. editor / Richard G Schwartz. 2. ed. Taylor and Francis, 2017. pp. 365-391
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