More on lexical bias: How efficient can a "lexical editor" be?

Nazbanou Nozari, Gary S Dell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The lexical bias effect (the tendency for phonological speech errors to create words more often than nonwords) has been debated for over 30 years. One account attributes the effect to a lexical editor, a strategic component of the production system that examines each planned phonological string, and suppresses it if it is a nonword. The alternative explanation is that the effect occurs automatically as a result of phonological-lexical feedback. Using a new paradigm, we explicitly asked participants to do lexical editing on their planned speech and compared performance on this inner lexical decision task to results obtained from the standard lexical decision task in three subsequent experiments. Our experimentally created "lexical editor" needed 300 ms to recognize and suppress nonwords, as determined by comparing reaction times when editing was and was not required. Therefore, we concluded that even though strategic lexical editing can be done, any such editing that occurs in daily speech occurs sporadically, if at all.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-307
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Memory and Language
Volume60
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2009

Fingerprint

editor
trend
Reaction Time
paradigm
Feedback
experiment
performance
Lexical Bias
Editing
Experiments
Nonwords
Lexical Decision Task
time

Keywords

  • Feedback
  • Lexical bias
  • Self-monitoring
  • Speech errors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Artificial Intelligence

Cite this

More on lexical bias : How efficient can a "lexical editor" be? / Nozari, Nazbanou; Dell, Gary S.

In: Journal of Memory and Language, Vol. 60, No. 2, 01.02.2009, p. 291-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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