Mood and cycling performance in response to three weeks of high-intensity, short-duration overtraining, and a two-week taper

Bonnie G. Berger, Robert W Motl, Brian D. Butki, David T. Martin, John G. Wilkinson, David R. Owen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined changes in mood and performance in response to high-intensity, short-duration overtraining and a subsequent taper. Pursuit cyclists (N = 8) at the United States Olympic Training Center completed the POMS and simulated 4-km pursuit performance tests throughout a six-week period. The six-week period included a baseline week, three weeks of overtraining that consisted primarily of high-intensity interval training, and a two-week taper. Total Mood Disturbance (TMD) scores displayed a quadratic polynomial effect across the three weeks of overtraining (p < .01), with the highest TMD scores occurring in the second week. Average TMD scores were lower during the taper than at baseline (p < .02) and lower at taper than overtraining (p < .0005). Cycling performance (pursuit time and average power output) improved during the three weeks of overtraining; additional improvements were observed during the taper. There were no significant correlations between TMD and performance. However, pursuit time, average power output, and mood disturbance scores were at optimal levels throughout the taper period. These findings suggest that high-intensity, short-duration overtraining may not result in an overtraining syndrome in 4-km pursuit cyclists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)444-457
Number of pages14
JournalSport Psychologist
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Mood and cycling performance in response to three weeks of high-intensity, short-duration overtraining, and a two-week taper'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this