Modification of a colliculo-thalamocortical mouse brain slice, incorporating 3-D printing of chamber components and multi-scale optical imaging

Bernard J. Slater, Anthony Y. Fan, Kevin A. Stebbings, M. Taher A Saif, Daniel A. Llano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The ability of the brain to process sensory information relies on both ascending and descending sets of projections. Until recently, the only way to study these two systems and how they interact has been with the use of in vivo preparations. Major advances have been made with acute brain slices containing the thalamocortical and cortico-thalamic pathways in the somatosensory, visual, and auditory systems. With key refinements to our recent modification of the auditory thalamocortical slice1, we are able to more reliably capture the projections between most of the major auditory midbrain and forebrain structures: the inferior colliculus (IC), medial geniculate body (MGB), thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), and the auditory cortex (AC). With portions of all these connections retained, we are able to answer detailed questions that complement the questions that can be answered with in vivo preparations. The use of flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging enables us to rapidly assess connectivity in any given slice and guide the ensuing experiment. Using this slice in conjunction with recording and imaging techniques, we are now better equipped to understand how information processing occurs at each point in the auditory forebrain as information ascends to the cortex, and the impact of descending cortical modulation. 3-D printing to build slice chamber components permits double-sided perfusion and broad access to networks within the slice and maintains the widespread connections key to fully utilizing this preparation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere53067
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Volume2015
Issue number103
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 18 2015

Fingerprint

Optical Imaging
Prosencephalon
Printing
Brain
Geniculate Bodies
Imaging techniques
Flavoproteins
Inferior Colliculi
Thalamic Nuclei
Auditory Cortex
Mesencephalon
Automatic Data Processing
Perfusion
Modulation
Experiments
Three Dimensional Printing

Keywords

  • Auditory system
  • Brain slice
  • Issue 103
  • Neuroscience
  • Neuroscience
  • Thalamic reticular nucleus
  • Thalamocortical
  • Thalamus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Modification of a colliculo-thalamocortical mouse brain slice, incorporating 3-D printing of chamber components and multi-scale optical imaging. / Slater, Bernard J.; Fan, Anthony Y.; Stebbings, Kevin A.; Saif, M. Taher A; Llano, Daniel A.

In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, Vol. 2015, No. 103, e53067, 18.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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