Models of form-related priming in comprehension and production

Padraig G. O’Seaghdha, Gary S Dell, Robert R. Peterson, Cornell Juliano

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

INTRODUCTION In comparison to the voluminous semantic priming literature, the dossier on form-related priming effects is rather meagre. For every published experiment that examines how MAT primes CAT, there are many more that look at DOG priming CAT. In a traditional spreading activation framework, form-related priming effects seem both empirically and theoretically straightforward. Similarly spelled and similar-sounding words prime one another by means of activation spreading through common elements, and benefits are accordingly observed in speeded tasks such as naming and lexical decision (e.g. Hillinger, 1980; Meyer, Schvaneveldt, & Ruddy, 1974). Likewise, form priming facilitates perceptual identification (e.g. Evett & Humphreys, 1981; Humphreys, Evett, & Taylor, 1982; Slowiaczek, Nusbaum, & Pisoni, 1987) and retrieval or phonological encoding of words from episodic (e.g. Meyer, 1990) or semantic memory (e.g. Bowles & Poon, 1985). Perhaps because these effects have appeared rather transparent, theoretical and empirical efforts in the areas of lexical perception and production have not made much use of form-related priming as a research tool (e.g. Adams, 1979; Dell, 1986; Glushko, 1979; McClelland & Rumelhart, 1981; Seidenberg, 1985). In this paper, we will demonstrate that form-related priming has an important role to play both in the development of general accounts of lexical processing, and as a tool for the analysis of language comprehension and production.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConnectionist Approaches to Natural Language Processing
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages373-408
Number of pages36
ISBN (Electronic)9781317266310
ISBN (Print)9781138640061
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Semantics
Language
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

O’Seaghdha, P. G., Dell, G. S., Peterson, R. R., & Juliano, C. (2016). Models of form-related priming in comprehension and production. In Connectionist Approaches to Natural Language Processing (pp. 373-408). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315636863

Models of form-related priming in comprehension and production. / O’Seaghdha, Padraig G.; Dell, Gary S; Peterson, Robert R.; Juliano, Cornell.

Connectionist Approaches to Natural Language Processing. Taylor and Francis, 2016. p. 373-408.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

O’Seaghdha, PG, Dell, GS, Peterson, RR & Juliano, C 2016, Models of form-related priming in comprehension and production. in Connectionist Approaches to Natural Language Processing. Taylor and Francis, pp. 373-408. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315636863
O’Seaghdha PG, Dell GS, Peterson RR, Juliano C. Models of form-related priming in comprehension and production. In Connectionist Approaches to Natural Language Processing. Taylor and Francis. 2016. p. 373-408 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315636863
O’Seaghdha, Padraig G. ; Dell, Gary S ; Peterson, Robert R. ; Juliano, Cornell. / Models of form-related priming in comprehension and production. Connectionist Approaches to Natural Language Processing. Taylor and Francis, 2016. pp. 373-408
@inbook{a0d46845ff23469cbd78fab10a24b999,
title = "Models of form-related priming in comprehension and production",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION In comparison to the voluminous semantic priming literature, the dossier on form-related priming effects is rather meagre. For every published experiment that examines how MAT primes CAT, there are many more that look at DOG priming CAT. In a traditional spreading activation framework, form-related priming effects seem both empirically and theoretically straightforward. Similarly spelled and similar-sounding words prime one another by means of activation spreading through common elements, and benefits are accordingly observed in speeded tasks such as naming and lexical decision (e.g. Hillinger, 1980; Meyer, Schvaneveldt, & Ruddy, 1974). Likewise, form priming facilitates perceptual identification (e.g. Evett & Humphreys, 1981; Humphreys, Evett, & Taylor, 1982; Slowiaczek, Nusbaum, & Pisoni, 1987) and retrieval or phonological encoding of words from episodic (e.g. Meyer, 1990) or semantic memory (e.g. Bowles & Poon, 1985). Perhaps because these effects have appeared rather transparent, theoretical and empirical efforts in the areas of lexical perception and production have not made much use of form-related priming as a research tool (e.g. Adams, 1979; Dell, 1986; Glushko, 1979; McClelland & Rumelhart, 1981; Seidenberg, 1985). In this paper, we will demonstrate that form-related priming has an important role to play both in the development of general accounts of lexical processing, and as a tool for the analysis of language comprehension and production.",
author = "O’Seaghdha, {Padraig G.} and Dell, {Gary S} and Peterson, {Robert R.} and Cornell Juliano",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4324/9781315636863",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781138640061",
pages = "373--408",
booktitle = "Connectionist Approaches to Natural Language Processing",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Models of form-related priming in comprehension and production

AU - O’Seaghdha, Padraig G.

AU - Dell, Gary S

AU - Peterson, Robert R.

AU - Juliano, Cornell

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - INTRODUCTION In comparison to the voluminous semantic priming literature, the dossier on form-related priming effects is rather meagre. For every published experiment that examines how MAT primes CAT, there are many more that look at DOG priming CAT. In a traditional spreading activation framework, form-related priming effects seem both empirically and theoretically straightforward. Similarly spelled and similar-sounding words prime one another by means of activation spreading through common elements, and benefits are accordingly observed in speeded tasks such as naming and lexical decision (e.g. Hillinger, 1980; Meyer, Schvaneveldt, & Ruddy, 1974). Likewise, form priming facilitates perceptual identification (e.g. Evett & Humphreys, 1981; Humphreys, Evett, & Taylor, 1982; Slowiaczek, Nusbaum, & Pisoni, 1987) and retrieval or phonological encoding of words from episodic (e.g. Meyer, 1990) or semantic memory (e.g. Bowles & Poon, 1985). Perhaps because these effects have appeared rather transparent, theoretical and empirical efforts in the areas of lexical perception and production have not made much use of form-related priming as a research tool (e.g. Adams, 1979; Dell, 1986; Glushko, 1979; McClelland & Rumelhart, 1981; Seidenberg, 1985). In this paper, we will demonstrate that form-related priming has an important role to play both in the development of general accounts of lexical processing, and as a tool for the analysis of language comprehension and production.

AB - INTRODUCTION In comparison to the voluminous semantic priming literature, the dossier on form-related priming effects is rather meagre. For every published experiment that examines how MAT primes CAT, there are many more that look at DOG priming CAT. In a traditional spreading activation framework, form-related priming effects seem both empirically and theoretically straightforward. Similarly spelled and similar-sounding words prime one another by means of activation spreading through common elements, and benefits are accordingly observed in speeded tasks such as naming and lexical decision (e.g. Hillinger, 1980; Meyer, Schvaneveldt, & Ruddy, 1974). Likewise, form priming facilitates perceptual identification (e.g. Evett & Humphreys, 1981; Humphreys, Evett, & Taylor, 1982; Slowiaczek, Nusbaum, & Pisoni, 1987) and retrieval or phonological encoding of words from episodic (e.g. Meyer, 1990) or semantic memory (e.g. Bowles & Poon, 1985). Perhaps because these effects have appeared rather transparent, theoretical and empirical efforts in the areas of lexical perception and production have not made much use of form-related priming as a research tool (e.g. Adams, 1979; Dell, 1986; Glushko, 1979; McClelland & Rumelhart, 1981; Seidenberg, 1985). In this paper, we will demonstrate that form-related priming has an important role to play both in the development of general accounts of lexical processing, and as a tool for the analysis of language comprehension and production.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065934480&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85065934480&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4324/9781315636863

DO - 10.4324/9781315636863

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:85065934480

SN - 9781138640061

SP - 373

EP - 408

BT - Connectionist Approaches to Natural Language Processing

PB - Taylor and Francis

ER -