Missing children in educational research: investigating school-based versus household-based assessments in India

Melissa Rae Goodnight, Savitri Bobde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Including all children in large-scale educational studies is a pressing concern. Omitting certain types of children from studies can lead to skewed findings that promote inaccuracies about learning levels or educational quality. Increasingly, assessments are a method for investigating the quality of education systems, but national assessments are typically conducted in classrooms and may fail to accurately represent a country’s full range of children. Alternatively, households can be a site for testing or collecting data on children’s learning. Analysing the quantitative data from two studies in India that use both household-based and school-based methods alongside data from Government of India sources, the issues with child representation in school-based assessments are examined, and the benefits of household-based research as an alternative are explored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-249
Number of pages25
JournalComparative Education
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2018

Keywords

  • assessment
  • data quality
  • evidence-based policy-making
  • Household-based research
  • India
  • sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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