Misleading Claims About Tobacco Products in YouTube Videos

Experimental Effects of Misinformation on Unhealthy Attitudes

Dolores Albarracin, Daniel Romer, Christopher Jones, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Patrick Jamieson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Recent content analyses of YouTube postings reveal a proliferation of user generated videos with misleading statements about the health consequences of various types of nontraditional tobacco use (eg, electronic cigarettes; e-cigarettes).

OBJECTIVE: This research was aimed at obtaining evidence about the potential effects of YouTube postings about tobacco products on viewers' attitudes toward these products.

METHODS: A sample of young adults recruited online (N=350) viewed one of four highly viewed YouTube videos containing misleading health statements about chewing tobacco, e-cigarettes, hookahs, and pipe smoking, as well as a control YouTube video unrelated to tobacco products.

RESULTS: The videos about e-cigarettes and hookahs led to more positive attitudes toward the featured products than did control videos. However, these effects did not fully translate into attitudes toward combustive cigarette smoking, although the pipe video led to more positive attitudes toward combustive smoking than did the chewing and the hookah videos, and the e-cigarette video led to more positive attitudes toward combustive cigarette smoking than did the chewing video.

CONCLUSIONS: This research revealed young people's reactions to misleading claims about tobacco products featured in popular YouTube videos. Policy implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e229
JournalJournal of Medical Internet Research
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 29 2018

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Tobacco Products
Communication
Smoking
Mastication
Smokeless Tobacco
Health
Tobacco Use
Research
Young Adult

Cite this

Misleading Claims About Tobacco Products in YouTube Videos : Experimental Effects of Misinformation on Unhealthy Attitudes. / Albarracin, Dolores; Romer, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Hall Jamieson, Kathleen; Jamieson, Patrick.

In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, Vol. 20, No. 6, 29.06.2018, p. e229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Albarracin, Dolores ; Romer, Daniel ; Jones, Christopher ; Hall Jamieson, Kathleen ; Jamieson, Patrick. / Misleading Claims About Tobacco Products in YouTube Videos : Experimental Effects of Misinformation on Unhealthy Attitudes. In: Journal of Medical Internet Research. 2018 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. e229.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Recent content analyses of YouTube postings reveal a proliferation of user generated videos with misleading statements about the health consequences of various types of nontraditional tobacco use (eg, electronic cigarettes; e-cigarettes).OBJECTIVE: This research was aimed at obtaining evidence about the potential effects of YouTube postings about tobacco products on viewers' attitudes toward these products.METHODS: A sample of young adults recruited online (N=350) viewed one of four highly viewed YouTube videos containing misleading health statements about chewing tobacco, e-cigarettes, hookahs, and pipe smoking, as well as a control YouTube video unrelated to tobacco products.RESULTS: The videos about e-cigarettes and hookahs led to more positive attitudes toward the featured products than did control videos. However, these effects did not fully translate into attitudes toward combustive cigarette smoking, although the pipe video led to more positive attitudes toward combustive smoking than did the chewing and the hookah videos, and the e-cigarette video led to more positive attitudes toward combustive cigarette smoking than did the chewing video.CONCLUSIONS: This research revealed young people's reactions to misleading claims about tobacco products featured in popular YouTube videos. Policy implications are discussed.",
author = "Dolores Albarracin and Daniel Romer and Christopher Jones and {Hall Jamieson}, Kathleen and Patrick Jamieson",
note = "{\circledC}Dolores Albarracin, Daniel Romer, Christopher Jones, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Patrick Jamieson. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 29.06.2018.",
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AU - Jamieson, Patrick

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Recent content analyses of YouTube postings reveal a proliferation of user generated videos with misleading statements about the health consequences of various types of nontraditional tobacco use (eg, electronic cigarettes; e-cigarettes).OBJECTIVE: This research was aimed at obtaining evidence about the potential effects of YouTube postings about tobacco products on viewers' attitudes toward these products.METHODS: A sample of young adults recruited online (N=350) viewed one of four highly viewed YouTube videos containing misleading health statements about chewing tobacco, e-cigarettes, hookahs, and pipe smoking, as well as a control YouTube video unrelated to tobacco products.RESULTS: The videos about e-cigarettes and hookahs led to more positive attitudes toward the featured products than did control videos. However, these effects did not fully translate into attitudes toward combustive cigarette smoking, although the pipe video led to more positive attitudes toward combustive smoking than did the chewing and the hookah videos, and the e-cigarette video led to more positive attitudes toward combustive cigarette smoking than did the chewing video.CONCLUSIONS: This research revealed young people's reactions to misleading claims about tobacco products featured in popular YouTube videos. Policy implications are discussed.

AB - BACKGROUND: Recent content analyses of YouTube postings reveal a proliferation of user generated videos with misleading statements about the health consequences of various types of nontraditional tobacco use (eg, electronic cigarettes; e-cigarettes).OBJECTIVE: This research was aimed at obtaining evidence about the potential effects of YouTube postings about tobacco products on viewers' attitudes toward these products.METHODS: A sample of young adults recruited online (N=350) viewed one of four highly viewed YouTube videos containing misleading health statements about chewing tobacco, e-cigarettes, hookahs, and pipe smoking, as well as a control YouTube video unrelated to tobacco products.RESULTS: The videos about e-cigarettes and hookahs led to more positive attitudes toward the featured products than did control videos. However, these effects did not fully translate into attitudes toward combustive cigarette smoking, although the pipe video led to more positive attitudes toward combustive smoking than did the chewing and the hookah videos, and the e-cigarette video led to more positive attitudes toward combustive cigarette smoking than did the chewing video.CONCLUSIONS: This research revealed young people's reactions to misleading claims about tobacco products featured in popular YouTube videos. Policy implications are discussed.

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