Microsporidia – Emergent Pathogens in the Global Food Chain

G. D. Stentiford, J. J. Becnel, L. M. Weiss, P. J. Keeling, E. S. Didier, B. A.P. Williams, S. Bjornson, M. L. Kent, M. A. Freeman, M. J.F. Brown, E. R. Troemel, K. Roesel, Y. Sokolova, K. F. Snowden, L. Solter

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Intensification of food production has the potential to drive increased disease prevalence in food plants and animals. Microsporidia are diversely distributed, opportunistic, and density-dependent parasites infecting hosts from almost all known animal taxa. They are frequent in highly managed aquatic and terrestrial hosts, many of which are vulnerable to epizootics, and all of which are crucial for the stability of the animal–human food chain. Mass rearing and changes in global climate may exacerbate disease and more efficient transmission of parasites in stressed or immune-deficient hosts. Further, human microsporidiosis appears to be adventitious and primarily associated with an increasing community of immune-deficient individuals. Taken together, strong evidence exists for an increasing prevalence of microsporidiosis in animals and humans, and for sharing of pathogens across hosts and biomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)336-348
Number of pages13
JournalTrends in Parasitology
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Fingerprint

Microsporidia
Food Chain
Microsporidiosis
Parasites
Edible Plants
Climate
Ecosystem
Food

Keywords

  • aquaculture
  • farming
  • immune-suppression
  • intensive rearing
  • phylogeny
  • zoonotic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Stentiford, G. D., Becnel, J. J., Weiss, L. M., Keeling, P. J., Didier, E. S., Williams, B. A. P., ... Solter, L. (2016). Microsporidia – Emergent Pathogens in the Global Food Chain. Trends in Parasitology, 32(4), 336-348. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pt.2015.12.004

Microsporidia – Emergent Pathogens in the Global Food Chain. / Stentiford, G. D.; Becnel, J. J.; Weiss, L. M.; Keeling, P. J.; Didier, E. S.; Williams, B. A.P.; Bjornson, S.; Kent, M. L.; Freeman, M. A.; Brown, M. J.F.; Troemel, E. R.; Roesel, K.; Sokolova, Y.; Snowden, K. F.; Solter, L.

In: Trends in Parasitology, Vol. 32, No. 4, 01.04.2016, p. 336-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Stentiford, GD, Becnel, JJ, Weiss, LM, Keeling, PJ, Didier, ES, Williams, BAP, Bjornson, S, Kent, ML, Freeman, MA, Brown, MJF, Troemel, ER, Roesel, K, Sokolova, Y, Snowden, KF & Solter, L 2016, 'Microsporidia – Emergent Pathogens in the Global Food Chain', Trends in Parasitology, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 336-348. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pt.2015.12.004
Stentiford GD, Becnel JJ, Weiss LM, Keeling PJ, Didier ES, Williams BAP et al. Microsporidia – Emergent Pathogens in the Global Food Chain. Trends in Parasitology. 2016 Apr 1;32(4):336-348. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pt.2015.12.004
Stentiford, G. D. ; Becnel, J. J. ; Weiss, L. M. ; Keeling, P. J. ; Didier, E. S. ; Williams, B. A.P. ; Bjornson, S. ; Kent, M. L. ; Freeman, M. A. ; Brown, M. J.F. ; Troemel, E. R. ; Roesel, K. ; Sokolova, Y. ; Snowden, K. F. ; Solter, L. / Microsporidia – Emergent Pathogens in the Global Food Chain. In: Trends in Parasitology. 2016 ; Vol. 32, No. 4. pp. 336-348.
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