Mi Casa no es Su Casa: The Fight for Equitable Transit-Oriented Development in an Inner-Ring Suburb

Willow Lung-Amam, Rolf Pendall, Elijah Knaap

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Transit-oriented development (TOD) often raises land values and can promote gentrification and the displacement in low-income communities. Little research, however, has shown how communities have organized to fight for more equitable TOD processes and outcomes within particular metropolitan contexts and dynamics of neighborhood change. This case study examines the role of neighborhood-based advocacy and organizing in fighting for equitable TOD and tackling key political and planning challenges in a predominantly Latinx immigrant inner-ring suburb. Their successes show the strengths of community-based, cross-sector coalitions in generating more equitable and inclusive TOD processes, plans, and policies that target conditions of place-based precarity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)442-455
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Planning Education and Research
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Fingerprint

suburb
gentrification
advocacy
fighting
income
community
land value
coalition
low income
immigrant
planning
policy
plan

Keywords

  • Hispanic or Latino communities
  • displacement
  • equitable transit-oriented development
  • immigrant or immigration
  • suburban decline
  • suburban poverty
  • transit-induced gentrification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Mi Casa no es Su Casa : The Fight for Equitable Transit-Oriented Development in an Inner-Ring Suburb. / Lung-Amam, Willow; Pendall, Rolf; Knaap, Elijah.

In: Journal of Planning Education and Research, Vol. 39, No. 4, 01.12.2019, p. 442-455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{923a12f948c6443da9969f614643ffa3,
title = "Mi Casa no es Su Casa: The Fight for Equitable Transit-Oriented Development in an Inner-Ring Suburb",
abstract = "Transit-oriented development (TOD) often raises land values and can promote gentrification and the displacement in low-income communities. Little research, however, has shown how communities have organized to fight for more equitable TOD processes and outcomes within particular metropolitan contexts and dynamics of neighborhood change. This case study examines the role of neighborhood-based advocacy and organizing in fighting for equitable TOD and tackling key political and planning challenges in a predominantly Latinx immigrant inner-ring suburb. Their successes show the strengths of community-based, cross-sector coalitions in generating more equitable and inclusive TOD processes, plans, and policies that target conditions of place-based precarity.",
keywords = "Hispanic or Latino communities, displacement, equitable transit-oriented development, immigrant or immigration, suburban decline, suburban poverty, transit-induced gentrification",
author = "Willow Lung-Amam and Rolf Pendall and Elijah Knaap",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0739456X19878248",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "442--455",
journal = "Journal of Planning Education and Research",
issn = "0739-456X",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mi Casa no es Su Casa

T2 - The Fight for Equitable Transit-Oriented Development in an Inner-Ring Suburb

AU - Lung-Amam, Willow

AU - Pendall, Rolf

AU - Knaap, Elijah

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Transit-oriented development (TOD) often raises land values and can promote gentrification and the displacement in low-income communities. Little research, however, has shown how communities have organized to fight for more equitable TOD processes and outcomes within particular metropolitan contexts and dynamics of neighborhood change. This case study examines the role of neighborhood-based advocacy and organizing in fighting for equitable TOD and tackling key political and planning challenges in a predominantly Latinx immigrant inner-ring suburb. Their successes show the strengths of community-based, cross-sector coalitions in generating more equitable and inclusive TOD processes, plans, and policies that target conditions of place-based precarity.

AB - Transit-oriented development (TOD) often raises land values and can promote gentrification and the displacement in low-income communities. Little research, however, has shown how communities have organized to fight for more equitable TOD processes and outcomes within particular metropolitan contexts and dynamics of neighborhood change. This case study examines the role of neighborhood-based advocacy and organizing in fighting for equitable TOD and tackling key political and planning challenges in a predominantly Latinx immigrant inner-ring suburb. Their successes show the strengths of community-based, cross-sector coalitions in generating more equitable and inclusive TOD processes, plans, and policies that target conditions of place-based precarity.

KW - Hispanic or Latino communities

KW - displacement

KW - equitable transit-oriented development

KW - immigrant or immigration

KW - suburban decline

KW - suburban poverty

KW - transit-induced gentrification

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074483499&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85074483499&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0739456X19878248

DO - 10.1177/0739456X19878248

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85074483499

VL - 39

SP - 442

EP - 455

JO - Journal of Planning Education and Research

JF - Journal of Planning Education and Research

SN - 0739-456X

IS - 4

ER -