Menstruation, sanitary products, and school attendance: Evidence from a randomized evaluation

Emily Oster, Rebecca Thornton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Policy-makers have cited menstruation and lack of sanitary products as barriers to girls' schooling. We evaluate these claims using a randomized evaluation of sanitary products provision to girls in Nepal. We report two findings. First, menstruation has a very small impact on school attendance. We estimate that girls miss a total of 0.4 days in a 180 day school year. Second, improved sanitary technology has no effect on reducing this (small) gap. Girls who randomly received sanitary products were no less likely to miss school during their period. We can reject (at the 1 percent level) the claim that better menstruation products close the attendance gap.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-100
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Economic Journal: Applied Economics
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

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