Media Commons: The process and value of centralizing services

Lori S. Mestre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: This paper aims to provide details of a collaborative campus effort that created a Media Commons at an undergraduate library at a major research university to provide students and faculty opportunities to experiment with emerging technologies, with expanded opportunities to learn of best practices in educational technology. Design/methodology/approach: This is a case study that used a web survey, focus groups, usage statistics, and interviews to determine the needs and best practices for creating and maintaining the Media Commons. Findings: Preliminary results indicate that this program provides value to students and faculty seeking to learn about and use multimedia for coursework and projects. It confirms the gap on campus for places students can go for loanable technology and consultation services in the production and editing of multimedia. Research limitations/implications: Because the Media Commons just launched there has not had a programmatic evaluation yet to assess the impact of this program. However, based on initial feedback, suggestions for improvements in the program are included. Practical implications: The rationale, process and efforts described in this paper can be replicated by other institutions that are interested in creating a Media Commons. Originality/value: Although there are many articles written about Learning Commons and Information Commons, there is not much available that documents the efforts of creating a Media Commons at a library and the rationale for centralizing and freely making available campus multimedia expertise and equipment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)669-687
Number of pages19
JournalLibrary Hi Tech
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 6 2013

Keywords

  • Academic libraries
  • Lending services
  • Libraries - technological innovations
  • Media commons
  • Multimedia library services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems
  • Library and Information Sciences

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