Measuring human perceptions of expressivity in natural and artificial systems through the live performance piece Time to compile

Catie Cuan, Erin Berl, Amy Laviers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Live performance is a vehicle where theatrical devices are used to exemplify, probe, or question how humans think about objects, each other, and themselves. This paper presents work using this vehicle to explore human perceptions of robot and human capabilities. The paper documents four performances at three distinct venues where user studies were conducted in parallel to live performance. A set of best practices for successful collection of data in this manner over the course of these trials is developed. Then, results of the studies are presented, giving insight into human opinions of a variety of natural and artificial systems. In particular, participants are asked to rate the expressivity of 12 distinct systems, displayed on stage, as well as themselves. The results show trends ranking objects lowest, then robots, then humans, then self, highest. Moreover, objects involved in the show were generally rated higher after the performance. Qualitative responses give further insight into how viewers experienced watching human performers alongside elements of technology. This work lays a framework for measuring human perceptions of robotic systems - and factors that influence this perception - inside live performance and suggests black-that through the lens of expressivity systems of similar type are rated similarly by audience members.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)364-379
Number of pages16
JournalPaladyn
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • HRI methodology
  • arts
  • dance
  • expressivity
  • performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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