Manual wheeled mobility - Current and future developments from the human engineering research laboratories

Rory A. Cooper, Alicia M. Koontz, Dan Ding, Annmarie Kelleher, Ian Rice, Rosemarie Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Medical rehabilitation and assistive technology are immersed in a world transitioning to a basis in evidence-based practice. Fortunately, there is a growing body of knowledge related to manual wheelchair mobility to form a basis for clinical decision making. The results from research studies are useful for designing better wheelchairs, fitting and training people appropriately, contributing to evidence-based-medicine and guiding future research. This review describes some of the work related to manual wheelchairs that has and is being conducted within the University of Pittsburgh and the Human Engineering Research Laboratories of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, and its application.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2210-2221
Number of pages12
JournalDisability and Rehabilitation
Volume32
Issue number26
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 8 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Active life-style
  • biomechanics
  • manual wheelchair
  • training
  • transfer biomechanics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

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