Managing the evolution of herbicide resistance

Jeffrey A. Evans, Patrick J. Tranel, Aaron G. Hager, Brian Schutte, Chenxi Wu, Laura A. Chatham, Adam S. Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Understanding and managing the evolutionary responses of pests and pathogens to control efforts is essential to human health and survival. Herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds undermine agricultural sustainability, productivity and profitability, yet the epidemiology of resistance evolution - particularly at landscape scales - is poorly understood. We studied glyphosate resistance in a major agricultural weed, Amaranthus tuberculatus (common waterhemp), using landscape, weed and management data from 105 central Illinois grain farms, including over 500 site-years of herbicide application records. RESULTS: Glyphosate-resistant (GR) A. tuberculatus occurrence was greatest in fields with frequent glyphosate applications, high annual rates of herbicide mechanism of action (MOA) turnover and few MOAs field-1 year-1. Combining herbicide MOAs at the time of application by herbicide mixing reduced the likelihood of GR A. tuberculatus. CONCLUSIONS: These findings illustrate the importance of examining large-scale evolutionary processes at relevant spatial scales. Although measures such as herbicide mixing may delay GR or other HR weed traits, they are unlikely to prevent them. Long-term weed management will require truly diversified management practices that minimize selection for herbicide resistance traits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-80
Number of pages7
JournalPest Management Science
Volume72
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • Amaranthus tuberculatus
  • Common waterhemp
  • Glyphosate resistance
  • Herbicide mixing
  • Herbicide rotation
  • Modes of action
  • Resistance evolution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Insect Science

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