Management, Organizational Justice and Emotional Exhaustion among Chinese Migrant Workers: Evidence from two Manufacturing Firms

Stephen J. Frenkel, Min Li, Simon Lloyd D Restubog

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article explores how Human Resource (HR) policies and practices influence employee perceptions of organizational justice, which in turn impacts employee emotions and feelings of emotional exhaustion. Using structural equation modelling and based on employee survey data drawn from two manufacturing organizations, we find that a strong HR system - perceived by workers as distinctive, attractive and consistently implemented - fosters perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactive justice. However, only distributive injustice leads to negative emotions and emotional exhaustion. This is explained by reference to the cultural and institutional context (China), status (migrant) and type of workers (semi-skilled, manual) included in the study. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications that arise from these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-147
Number of pages27
JournalBritish Journal of Industrial Relations
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

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