Mammalian cell-based sensors for high throughput screening for detecting chemical residues, pathogens, and toxins in food

S. Kintzios, P. Banerjee

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter is an update of current biosensor technologies based on mammalian cells for food safety and quality control applications. Particular emphasis is given to commercially available methods and products (as well as their market evaluation so far). The majority of the commercially operational cell-based biosensors available for food safety utilize higher eukaryotic cells as opposed to prokaryotic cells. The considerable advantages, and also some weaknesses, of the mammalian cell approach are evaluated against other cell-based biosensor systems. Finally, this chapter illustrates the perspectives of using these novel detection platforms for investigating, for the first time in the history of analytic science, the synergistic effects between several pollutants and assessing biological risk at various levels and against multiorgan and multispecies elements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHigh Throughput Screening for Food Safety Assessment
Subtitle of host publicationBiosensor Technologies, Hyperspectral Imaging and Practical Applications
EditorsArun K Bhunia, Moon S Kim, Chris R Taitt
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages123-146
Number of pages24
ISBN (Electronic)9780857098078
ISBN (Print)9780857098016
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameWoodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition

Keywords

  • Bioelectric recognition
  • Biosensor
  • Cell-based sensor
  • Commercial instrumentation
  • Foodborne pathogens
  • Impedance spectroscopy
  • Membrane engineering
  • Pesticide residues

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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