Mad cows and sick birds: Financing international responses to animal disease in developing countries

Alex E Winter-Nelson, Karl M. Rich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Because many animal diseases have strong transboundary attributes, their control can be reasonably characterised as an international public good. The potential for reservoirs of transboundary diseases to persist in developing countries that lack the capacity or incentives to control them implies a need for international financial transfers to fund control. However, the costs of control can be large compared with development assistance budgets, and the benefits small compared with the global benefits of control and the local benefits of other priority investments. This article outlines a framework for setting priorities for international development assistance for animal disease control based on the incidence of market and non-market impacts and the context in which outbreaks take place in endemic and susceptible countries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-226
Number of pages16
JournalDevelopment Policy Review
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

Keywords

  • Avian influenza
  • Foreign aid
  • Livestock
  • Transboundary diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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