Macular Xanthophylls and Event-Related Brain Potentials among Overweight Adults and Those with Obesity

Caitlyn G. Edwards, Anne M. Walk, Corinne N. Cannavale, Sharon V. Thompson, Ginger E. Reeser, Hannah D. Holscher, Naiman A. Khan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Scope: Macular accumulation of xanthophyll carotenoids (lutein, zeaxanthin) is known to have neuroprotective potential, yet their influence on cognition among overweight adults and those with obesity remains limited. This study examines the impact of macular xanthophylls on attentional resource allocation and information processing speed among adults with BMI ≥ 25 kg m−2. Methods and Results: Adults between 25 and 45 years (N = 101) complete heterochromatic flicker photometry to determine macular pigment optical density (MPOD). Event-related brain potentials are recorded during a visual oddball task. Amplitude and latency of the N2 and P3 indexed attentional resource allocation and information processing speed. Covariates included age, sex, education, intelligence quotient (IQ), %Fat (DXA), and dietary lutein and zeaxanthin (Diet History Questionnaire II). MPOD is inversely related to P3 peak amplitude during standard trials and P3 peak latency during target trials. Therefore, individuals with higher MPOD dedicate fewer attentional resources when attentional demands are low while exhibiting faster information processing speed when attentional demands are increased. Further, MPOD is inversely related to the N2 mean amplitude during targets, signifying greater inhibitory control. Conclusion: These findings are the first to link macular xanthophylls to neuroelectric indices of attentional and inhibitory control among adults with overweight and obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1801059
JournalMolecular Nutrition and Food Research
Volume63
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • body composition
  • carotenoids
  • diet
  • executive function
  • neuroefficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science

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